Special guest speakers for May – Gerald West and Beverley Haddad

Pilgrim - Wednesday, February 28, 2018

THE JD NORTHEY LECTURE Thursday 3 May 2018 

The Bible as a Site of Struggle in South Africa, from Apartheid to after Liberation
Presented by: Gerald West Senior Professor University of KwaZulu-Natal Pietermaritzburg, South Africa

A story is told by a black African prophet-healer in 1930s South Africa of how the Bible was stolen from the Europeans who stole African cattle. This story recognises that the Bible of imperial Dutch traders has become, over centuries, an iconic African book. This story frames other ways in which the Bible is a site of struggle in South Africa’s history. The lecture will analyse how the concept ‘site of struggle’ has been used in the ‘struggle’ against apartheid, focussing on how the Bible itself, intrinsically, came to be recognised as a particular site of struggle. Within this trajectory the lecture will also reflect on how the notion of the Bible as a site of struggle helps us understand what is happening with religion in South Africa’s post-apartheid public realm.

Gerald West teaches Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and African Biblical Hermeneutics in the School of Religion, Philosophy, and Classics at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. He is Director of the Ujamaa Centre for Community Development and Research, a project in which socially engaged biblical scholars and ordinary African readers of the Bible from poor, working-class, and marginalised communities collaborate for social transformation.

Date: Thursday 3 May 2018
Time: 7.00pm
Location: Pilgrim Theological College 29 College Crescent, Parkville Vic 3052
Cost: Gold coin donation
RSVP: by Monday 30 April 2018 info@ctm.uca.edu.au
For further information, contact Monica Jyotsna Melanchthon Monica.melanchthon@pilgrim.edu.au Tel: +61 3 9340 8835

THE JD NORTHEY LECTURE Thursday 17 May 2018

Diakonia and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals: A Theological Case Study from South Africa

Presented by: Rev Dr Beverley Haddad Senior Research Associate University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa

The nature of the church’s work in the world, Diakonia, is contested within various theological traditions. This paper argues that all Diakonia must be prophetic in orientation and engage structural injustice in the world. The United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development offers a framework that churches can use to define issues of injustice that need to be addressed as well as an opportunity to assess the extent to which their diaconal work is prophetic. The Sustainable Development Goals will be outlined and briefly evaluated. The South African ideo-theological of the pre- and post-apartheid context is explored as a case study to demonstrate the importance of adopting a prophetic stance in engaging structural injustice. The paper concludes by offering ways forward in prophetic diaconal action that engages the United Nations Agenda in order to bring about social transformation.

Rev Prof Beverley Haddad is Senior Research Associate at the School of Religion, Philosophy and Classics, at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. She has worked in the field of theology and development for the past twenty years and has published widely in this field, particularly concerning issues of gender, religion and HIV and AIDS. She is also a member of the Circle of Concerned African Women Theologians. Ordained in the Anglican Church of Southern Africa in 1992, she has assisted in a variety of church communities. During the apartheid years in South Africa she was an activist in the struggle for justice and remains committed to engaging issues that pertain to the prophetic witness and service of the church.

Date: Thursday 17 May 2018 Time: 7.00pm
Location: Pilgrim Theological College 29 College Crescent, Parkville Vic 3052
Cost: Gold coin donation
RSVP: by Monday 14 May 2018 info@ctm.uca.edu.au
For further information, contact Monica Jyotsna Melanchthon Monica.melanchthon@pilgrim.edu.au Tel: +61 3 9340 8835


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