Field C – Christian Thought and History

 

CH1000P/ CH8000P

MEMORY, HISTORY AND THE HISTORIANS
Kerrie Handasyde

Field C – Church History (CH)

Semester 2: Thursday Afternoon
Available online and on campus

How has the Christian community remembered and told its story? Eusebius thought everything was solved by

Constantine; Augustine thought he could not have been more wrong; Dorothy Day looked for Christ in the streets. Distinct approaches of the writers, as well as the music, architecture, and art across 2000 years open up discussion of connections between memory and history and the place of both in theological understanding.

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AR/CH1030P/ AR/CH2030P/ AR/CH8030P

REASON AND REVIVAL
Kerrie Handasyde

Field C – Church History (CH)

Also available Field A – Religious Studies (AR)
Semester 1: Wednesday Afternoon

Religious literature and music provides a rich source of learning. This unit examines the history of Protestantism in the eighteenth to mid-twentieth centuries through the lens of religious literature and music. Using a wide variety of texts including poetry, novels, hymns and songs, drama and memoirs, we seek to explore trends in the development of Protestant belief and spirituality around the world, with a special emphasis on the Australian experience. Topics include the Enlightenment, conversion and revival, social activism, nature, writing for children, and the life of the church.

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 CH2020P/ CH3020P/ CH9020P

SECULAR AND SACRED
Katharine Massam

Field C – Church History (CH)

Semester 1: 6, 13, 20 May, 5, 12, 19 August
Wed 6pm – 9pm
Available online and on campus

What do pubs, rivers, sports grounds, art galleries and the design of domestic houses tell us about faith and life in Australia? This unit takes iconic places and the stories embedded in them as the starting place for a discussion of the relationship between secular and sacred, offering an overview of Australian history and its implications for the future in the life of communities of faith.

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 AH/CH3445P/ AH/CH9445P

COOPERATIVE CAFÉ: COMMUNITY, HISTORY AND THE NEW ECONOMICS
Katharine Massam

Field C – Church History (CH)

Also available in Field A – Humanities (AH)
Semester 2: Intensive 4, 5, 11, 12, 18, 19 September
Fri 6pm – 9pm, Sat 9.30am – 4.30pm

Before there was social enterprise there was the cooperative movement. Come along and learn about the radical tradition that supports this growing global movement for a new economy. Examine the models of religious community (from monastic to Quaker and Methodist) that have informed the core cooperative principle of democratic governance by member-owners. Join our innovative collaboration with Co-operative Bonds and the Business Council of Cooperatives and Mutuals (BCCM) to workshop business models that might establish a café (or similar enterprise) as a cooperative.

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CT1000P/ CT8000P

CHRISTIANITY’S BIG IDEAS
Geoff Thompson

Field C – Systematic Theology (CT)

Semester 1: Wednesday Afternoon
Available online and on campus

From the outset Christian faith provoked new and controversial ideas. In a world of competing and contested ideas this subject explores what it might mean for the central truth-claims of Christianity to nurture a theological vision that (like a work of art) engages the imagination, intellect and heart, serving the faith community in witness to the world.

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CT/DA/DM2080P/ CT/DA/DM8080P

THE LIVING PEOPLE OF GOD: LOCAL, GLOBAL AND MISSION
Geoff Thompson

Field C – Systematic Theology (CT)

Also Available in Field D Mission and Ministry (DA) and Missiology (DM)
Semester 1: Tuesday Morning
Available online and on campus

As part of this unit, we look at the character and history of minority ancient Christian communities (e.g. India, China, Ethiopia), the twentieth-century emergence of churches in the global south, and the post-Christendom realities faced by mainline churches in lands marked by “Western culture” (with particular reference to the Uniting Church in Australia).

Against this background, the unit explores the roots of the church in the ministry of risen, crucified Jesus Christ and the sending of the Spirit. Attention will also be given to the classical marks of the church (one, holy, catholic and apostolic) as well as to the particular marks noted by the Reformers (preaching and sacraments).

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CT/DM2070P/ CT/DM9070P

JESUS THE CHRIST IN WORLD CHRISTIAN PERSPECTIVE
John Flett

Field C – Systematic Theology (CT)

Also available in Field D – Missiology (DM)
Semester 1: Tuesday Night
Available online and on campus

Go beyond the boundaries of Europe to meet scholarly understandings of Jesus Christ using language as ‘Bodhisattva’, ‘Avatara’, ‘guru’, ‘prophet’, or ‘ancestor’; and in relation to other religious traditions that bring new lenses. This unit explores christologies developed outside Western frames of reference and addresses the broader questions of method as well as content that they raise for theology, especially in terms of the distinct and various implications for mission.

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CT3000P/ CT9000P

TRINITY, SOCIETY AND DIALOGUE
Frank Rees and Margaret Campbell

Field C – Systematic Theology (CT)

Semester 2: Tuesday Morning

How big is the leap from the stories of Jesus in the Gospels to the statements about his humanity and divinity in the creeds? What does in mean for Christians to proclaim the Triune God? This unit explores the controversial developments of the early Councils and the re-emergence of Trinitarian thought in the twentieth century, in the encounter with atheism and with other faiths. 

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CT3400P/ CT9400P

SHOULDER TO SHOULDER: READINGS IN FEMINIST THEOLOGY
Stephen Burns and others

Field C – Systematic Theology (CT)

Semester 2: Thursday Morning

This seminar-style unit gives you the opportunity to read ground-breaking early titles in feminist theology (Beyond God the Father, Sexism and God-talk) alongside more recent classics that challenge and pursue their assumptions (Indecent Theology, Daughters of Anowa). In 2020 the reading will focus on two themes in particular, exploring what a variety of feminist theologians say about Christology and about leadership in the Christian community.

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CT9040P

A CHANGED CLIMATE FOR THEOLOGY
Deborah Guess

Field C – Systematic Theology (CT)

Semester 2: Intensive 23, 24, 25, 27, 28, 29 July
Available online and on campus

A day rarely passes when the topic of climate change is not on the agenda. The ecological phenomenon of climate change relates to the essentially religious question of who we are and how we are to live. This unit examines the question of what an ecological context and approach means for Christian theology and praxis. It identifies some of the challenges this presents for questions of faith and understanding, and explores a number of significant ecological resources in the rich Christian tradition.

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For more information about any of these courses, contact College registrar Erlinda Loverseed on 03 9340 8892 or at registrar@pilgrim.edu.au