Field B – Biblical Studies

BA1010P/BA2010P/BA8010P
Life, History and the People of God in the Hebrew Scriptures 
J Havea and B Kolia

Semester 1 

Mode of delivery:
External Online Synchronous

Delivery Notes: 
Lectures will be recorded, and the video clips (2 for each session) will be made available on ARK. The videos will be available 7 days before the scheduled session, and students may watch them at a convenient time. Students are advised to read ALL assigned readings before watching the lectures.

A Tutorial session will be held live for 1hr during weeks 1-12 (Tuesdays, 2-3pm AET), using ZOOM (link will be available on ARK). Students are required to attend ALL Tutorial sessions, which are designed to help with their learning and fulfilling the assessment tasks.

Unit Description
Come and increase your knowledge and understanding of the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) and gain new insights into the life, history, and faith of the people of God in ancient Israel. In this introductory unit, you will survey the contents of the Old Testament and study the historical contexts, genres, and theology of the OT books. As well as understanding the texts in their ancient context, you will explore their relation to issues of contemporary faith.

 

BN1010P/ 8010P
Introduction to the New Testament: Stories, Texts, Beliefs 
R Whitaker

Semester 2 
Tuesday, 2 pm to 5 pm

Delivery Mode:  
Internal – face to face and External Online Asynchronous

Delivery Notes:
The face-to-face class will meet weekly at Pilgrim (Parkville) for lectures, workshops and discussion. No prior knowledge is assumed.

For online class, lectures and content will be available for students to work through in their own time. The asynchronous content will be supported by a weekly, non-optional evening online tutorial on Mondays at 7.30pm (Melbourne time).

Unit Description
Immerse yourself in an introduction to New Testament history, texts, and theology.  Beginning with the letters of Paul as the earliest extant Christian literature and surveying the development of gospel literature as well as other forms of early Christian writing, you will be introduced to the rise of the early Christian movement and explore the range of developing theological beliefs that characterised the first two generations of early Christianity.

 

BN2030P/3030P/ 9030P
Mark’s Gospel in Context 
S Douglas

Semester 2
Thursday, 6 pm to 9 pm

Delivery Mode: 
Internal – Face to face

Delivery Notes:

Unit Description
The Gospel of Mark is a lectionary gospel full of humour, insight, and challenge,   so why not come and deepen your understanding of Mark’s story of Jesus? This course will trace the narrative of this text as we pay attention to the literary, social, cultural, and theological contexts from which this gospel emerges. Taking this course will deepen your skills in interpreting the gospels and prepare you for the ‘Year of Mark’.

 

BN2060P/BN3060P/ BN9060P
Reading Romans: Exegesis, Theology, Context
S Winter

Semester 2
Thursday, 9.30 am to 12.30 pm

Delivery Mode:
Internal – face to face and External Online Synchronous

Delivery Notes:
The unit will run between 9.30 a.m.–12.30 p.m. on Thursday mornings. The preference is for students to attend in person at the CTM. Students who are unable to attend face to face should make arrangements to do so synchronously online.
Classes will be planned to enable blended learning between classroom and online attendees, and aspects will be recorded for class use.

Unit Description
Romans is the longest and probably the most influential letter that Paul wrote. It is also pretty challenging to interpret. This unit gives you a chance to wrestle with Romans and, as a result, to win a better understanding of Paul’s gospel in its ancient and contemporary contexts. You will learn how to approach the letter’s situation and argument in ways that shed light on Paul’s theology and its continued significance. You will also be given exegetical tools that will help you understand the difficult texts in the letter.

BS3010P/BS9010P
Reading and Interpreting the Bible in Contemporary Times  
J Havea

Semester 2 
Intensive: 29-30 July; 5-6 Aug; 19 Aug

Mode of Delivery:  
Blended and Synchronous

Delivery Notes: 
The class will meet face to face on site at the CTM, Parkville, from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm with scheduled breaks.

Students are also expected to attend 6 hours of online (synchronous) sessions on mutually agreed upon times over the rest of the semester.

Unit Description
This course will introduce you to exciting (both traditional and more recent, innovative) ways of interpreting the Bible, with a strong focus on methods that help us read and hear the Bible in our contemporary times. You will be introduced to the strengths and weaknesses of historical, literary, and cultural approaches (including feminist, queer, and postcolonial criticisms). These methods will be explored with reference to selected texts from the Old Testament.

 

BA3040P/BA9040P
Gender, Justice and Empire: Contextual Readings of the Old Testament 
M Melanchthon

Semester 1 
Intensive: 11, 12, 18, 19 of March and 1 and 2 April

Mode of Delivery:
Internal – Face to face and External Online Synchronous

Delivery Notes:  
This intensive (face to face) is offered over a course of 6 days (Fridays and Saturdays). The class will meet from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm on the advertised dates and will include scheduled breaks.
This unit is also available in the External-Online Synchronous mode and will meet at the same time as the intensive.
The Scriptural texts dealt with in this unit raise issues pertaining to women’s lives such as sexuality, and violence – both past and present – which some may find troubling.
The schedule, outline and the reading material for this unit will be available to the student on the ARK Meta site, two weeks before the class begins for those who may wish to get a head start on the reading.

Expectations:

  1. Regular Attendance and informed participation in class sessions
  2. Submission of two assessment tasks – 1. Essay on Reading Material 2. And Exegetical Essay. See unit guide for requirements and the ARK child site for grading criteria.

Unit Description
This intensive six-day unit explores the relationship between issues of gender, justice and empire in Old Testament interpretation.
We study a number of Old Testament texts, particularly those which narrate the experience of women within the wider social and imperial contexts of ancient Israel. You will engage in a close reading of a range of primary Old Testament texts and contemporary feminist/womanist and other (culturally diverse) scholarship.
The approach is interdisciplinary and will provide students opportunity to study these texts alongside contemporary women’s experiences and portrayals of women in other media such as art, film, poetry, and law.

 

BN3130P/BN9130P
The Book of Revelation: Evil, Empire and Eschatology 
R Whitaker

Semester 1 
Wednesday, 9.30 am to 12.30 pm

Mode of Delivery:  
Internal face to face

Delivery Notes: 
This upper-level New Testament class will be primarily run as a seminar style class. Students will be expected to lead and participate in discussions based on the readings. There will also be guest lectures from Revelation scholars representing a range of perspectives. Students should usually have completed at least 2 prior units in NT / OT.

Unit Description
The Book of Revelation is a highly symbolic, political, and justice-oriented text that speaks to a range of ancient and contemporary issues. This unit offers a close exegetical study of the Revelation in its historical and political setting. Particular attention will be given to the visual context of Revelation, noting how the author of Revelation utilizes and critiques ancient statuary, visual rhetoric and imperial iconography to expose evil and offer an alternate vision of God’s reign. A Greek tutorial stream will be provided for students with Greek.