Field A – Humanities

H/DE 2102P/ 8102P 
Culture and Expressions of Belief 
A Burritt

Semester 1 
Thursday, 2 pm to 5 pm

Mode of Delivery:  
Internal – face to face

Delivery Notes: 
The Unit will be delivered through face-to-face classes 2.00 – 5.00 pm on Thursdays during Semester 1.
Classes will be a combination of lectures, tutorials, and small group workshop activities.
Required reading will be set for each class and pre-reading will be available two weeks prior to the commencement of classes.
Lectures will be recorded, and PowerPoint slides used in classes will be available through ARK.

Unit Description
We live in a culturally diverse society where visual images, texts and objects are powerful communicators of cultures and beliefs. Historically Christians have had a dynamic relationship with visual culture, literacy, and artefacts, as they have sought to express their spiritual lives. This unit invites you to explore the relationship between images, objects and the expression of spirituality and the significance for our culturally diverse parishes, schools, and community.

 

AL1100P/8100P 
Introduction to New Testament Greek A 
S Chen

Semester 1 
Thursday, 9.30 am to 12.30 pm

Mode of Delivery:  
Internal – face to face and External Online Synchronous.

Delivery Notes: 
This unit is also delivered as an Online Synchronous unit. Students will be able to attend this unit in real time either on location or via zoom.

Unit Description
One of our liveliest and most energetic classes!   Learn a whole new alphabet and start to read the original language of the New Testament. Translate and interpret short passages from Scripture as well as other writing from the first and second centuries.

 

AL2200P/8200P
Introduction to New Testament Greek B 
S Chen

Semester 2 
Thursday, 9.30 am to 12.30 pm

Mode of Delivery:  
Internal – face to face and External Online Synchronous

Delivery Notes: 
This unit is also delivered as an Online Synchronous unit. Students will be able to attend this unit in real time either on location or via zoom.

Unit Description
Can a better understanding of Greek language enhance your understanding of the New Testament? Even if you don’t know any Greek, this unit develops your understanding of New Testament Greek syntax, grammar, and vocabulary. About a third of the unit will be devoted to the translation of Greek New Testament passages of various genres, prepared in advance by the students. By engaging with a biblical text in its original language you will see how studying Greek can assist in its interpretation.

 

AP1000P/ 8000P 
Philosophy for Understanding Theology 
J Martis

Semester 1 
Wednesday, 9.30 am to 12.30 pm

Mode of Delivery:  
Internal – face to face and External  Online Synchronous

Delivery Notes: 
Students will be expected to be present weekly in real time, 9.30 a.m-12.30 p.m. on Wednesdays in term time. Depending on their choice of mode at the outset of the semester, their presence will be either physical or via Zoom. A tutorial segment will be included in the 3-hour class.

Unit Description
Behind every famous theologian there is a famous philosopher or philosophical system. Platonism is part of the context of the New Testament, and for Augustine and so for Luther; Aristotle sets the scene for Thomas Aquinas; Kant for Schleiermacher; Hegel for Kierkegaard and Barth; Heidegger for Bultmann and Rahner. See the theologians more clearly by appreciating the intellectual worlds that inform them.

 

 

AP2600P/3600P/9600P 
Hermeneutics 
J Martis

Semester 2 
Thursday, 6 pm to 9 pm

Mode of Delivery:  
Internal – face to face and External Online Synchronous

Delivery Notes: 
Students will be expected to be present weekly in real time, 6 pm – 9 pm on Thursdays in term time. Depending on their choice of mode at the outset of the semester, their presence will be either physical or via Zoom. A tutorial segment will be included in the 3-hour class.

Unit Description
This unit explores interpretation from a philosophical perspective. You will study the development of hermeneutical theory in the work of Schleiermacher, Dilthey, Heidegger, Gadamer and Ricouer, and the contributions of structuralists, poststructuralists and others. Questions explored include: How does hermeneutics link the ancient world to our own? How should we understand truth and meaning? How can we know what texts mean? Included here are issues of how textual meaning might be authoritatively determined, and whether an adequate “explanation of explanation” is to be had. If you’re not sure what hermeneutics means, you will be an expert by the end of this unit.

 

AP2720P/AP3720P/AP9720P 
Greek Sources of Western Thought  
J Martis

Semester 1 
Thursday, 6 pm to 9 pm

Mode of Delivery:  
Internal – face to face and External Online Synchronous

Delivery Notes:  
Students will be expected to be present weekly in real time, 6 pm- 9 pm on Thursdays in term time. Depending on their choice of mode at the outset of the semester, their presence will be either physical or via Zoom. A tutorial segment will be included in the 3-hour class.

Unit Description
You may have heard of Plato and Aristotle, but how well do you understand their ideas and their influence? This unit tracks the ways that the ideas of these two great philosophical thinkers laid the foundation for Western philosophy. It also looks at the way that Greek philosophy was important to the development of early Christian theology.

 

AP2750P/ 3750P/9750P
Belief After Philosophy: Postmodernism and Religious Faith 
J Martis

Semester 2 
Wednesday, 9.30 am to 12.30 pm

Delivery Mode:  
Internal – face to face and External Online Synchronous

Delivery Notes:  
Students will be expected to be present weekly in real time, 9.30 am – 12.30 pm on Wednesdays during the teaching semester. Depending on their choice of mode at the outset of the semester, their presence will be either physical or via Zoom. A tutorial segment will be included in the 3-hour class.

Unit Description
How can we still speak meaningfully of God or religious faith in today’s world? This unit explores the relationship between postmodernism and religious faith. Does the notion of God as foundation amount to limitation of the divine, or even idolatry? Discover how postmodern thinking bids to rework some traditional connections between faith and philosophy.

 

AR1150P
Who are our Neighbours? Multicultural Difference and Interreligious Relationship  
(J Flett and M Melanchthon)

Semester 1  
Fortnightly
Monday, 9.30 am to 5 pm

Mode of Delivery:  
Internal – Face to face

Delivery Notes:  
This unit will meet over 6 Mondays during Semester 1, 2022 from 9:30 am to 5:00 pm every two weeks throughout the timetabled semester. Students may be required to attend tutorials via Zoom on the alternate Mondays.
The Schedule, Outline and Reading material will be available on the ARK meta unit site to all enrolled students a week before the start of class for those who may wish to get a head start on the reading,
The class will include lectures/presentations by visiting scholars and religious personalities and will incorporate visits to religious centres and places of worship (Covid restrictions permitting).
Expectations:

Unit Description
For UCA Formation cohort only
The rich, cultural diversity in Australia is declared to be one of its greatest strengths. 30% of Australia’s population were born overseas! A significant component of this diversity is religious difference. How important is it for prospective Christian ministers to have some knowledge of other religions?  This unit examines the responsible hospitality of the congregation in its local neighbourhood and offers the opportunity for theological reflection on interreligious encounter both from the perspective of the Christian faith’s own self-description, and from the perspective of the religious other.