Field A – Humanities

 

AL1100P/ AL8100P

INTRODUCTION TO NEW TESTAMENT GREEK A
Sunny Chen

Field A – Languages (AL)
Semester 1: Thursday Morning

One of our liveliest and most energetic classes! Learn a whole new alphabet, and start to read the original language of the New Testament. Translate and interpret short passages from Scripture as well as other writing from the first and second centuries.

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AL2200P/ AL8200P

INTRODUCTION TO NEW TESTAMENT GREEK B
Sunny Chen

Field A – Languages (AL)
Semester 2: Thursday Morning

Can a better understanding of Greek language enhance your understanding of the New Testament? This unit develops your understanding of New Testament Greek syntax, grammar and vocabulary. About a third of the unit will be devoted to the translation of extended portions of the Greek New Testament (e.g. chapters from 1 John), prepared in advance by the students. By engaging with a biblical text in its original language you will see how studying Greek can assist in its interpretation.

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AL/BN3000P/ AL/BN9000P

ADVANCED GREEK READING
Robyn Whitaker

Field A – Languages (AL)

Also available in Field B – New Testament (BN)
Semester 1: Tuesday Afternoon

There is no better way of improving your Greek skills than reading and translating texts. Aimed at those who have completed some Greek study already, this unit will help you develop skills for translation and interpretation, using a range of biblical and related texts. Come and deepen your understanding by reading the texts in their original language.

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AP1000P/ AP8000P

PHILOSOPHY FOR UNDERSTANDING THEOLOGY
John Martis, SJ

Field A – Philosophy (AP)
Semester 1: Wednesday Morning

Behind every famous theologian there is a famous philosopher or philosophical system. Platonism is part of the context of the New Testament, and for Augustine and so for Luther; Aristotle sets the scene for Thomas Aquinas, Kant for Schleiermacher, Hegel for Kierkegaard and Barth; Heidegger for Bultmann and Rahner. See the theologians more clearly by appreciating the intellectual worlds that inform them. 

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AP2720P/ AP3720P/ AP9720P

GREEK SOURCES OF WESTERN THOUGHT
John Martis, SJ

Field A – Philosophy (AP)
Semester 1: Thursday Night

Available online and on campus

You may have heard of Plato and Aristotle, but how well do you understand their ideas and their influence? This unit tracks the ways that the ideas of these two great philosophical thinkers laid the foundation for Western philosophy. It also looks at the way that Greek philosophy was important to the development of early Christian theology.

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HERMENEUTICS
John Martis, SJ

Field A – Philosophy (AP)
Semester 2: Wednesday Afternoon

Available online and on campus

This unit explores interpretation from a philosophical perspective. You will study the development of hermeneutical theory in the work of Schleiermacher, Dilthey, Heidegger, Gadamer and Ricouer, and the contributions of structuralists, poststructuralists and others. Questions explored include: How does hermeneutics link the ancient world to our own? How should we understand truth and meaning? How can we know what texts mean? Included here are issues of how textual meaning might be authoritatively determined, and whether an adequate “explanation of explanation” is to be had. If you’re not sure what hermeneutics means, you will be an expert by the end of this unit.

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AP2750P/ AP3750P/ AP9750P

BELIEF AFTER PHILOSOPHY: POSTMODERNISM AND RELIGIOUS FAITH
John Martis, SJ

Field A – Philosophy (AP)
Semester 2: Thursday Night

Available online and on campus

How can we still speak meaningfully of God or religious faith in today’s world? This unit explores the relationship between postmodernism and religious faith. Does the notion of God as foundation amount to limitation of the divine or even idolatry? Discover how postmodern thinking bids to rework some traditional connections between faith and philosophy.

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AH9100P/ BS9100P

THINKING OTHERWISE: FEMINIST THEOLOGIES
Cathryn McKinney

Field A – Humanities (AH)

Also available in Field B – Biblical Studies (BS)
Semester 1: Intensive 4 May, 1, 8, 15 June, 3 August

Explore the contribution of feminist scholarship to Christian theology. Survey the history of feminism as a term; chart the growth of significance within theological discourse since the 1980s and resistance to it. Consider the significance of feminist methods, hermeneutics and approaches to reading and interpreting Scripture. Explore the consequent impact on feminist theologising, analysis of Christian doctrine, and the understanding of Christian tradition and liturgical life. We pay particular attention to the intersection of feminism with other theologies of liberation, against structures of oppression. Considering a range of contemporary social issues, we examine the actual and potential contribution of feminist insights to shaping nuanced and vibrant theological perspectives.

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AH/CH3445P/ AH/CH9445P

COOPERATIVE CAFÉ: COMMUNITY, HISTORY AND THE NEW ECONOMICS
Katharine Massam

Field A – Humanities (AH)

Also available in Field C– Church History (CH)
Semester 2: Intensive 4, 5, 11, 12, 18, 19 September

Fri 6pm – 9pm, Sat 9.30am – 4.30pm

Before there was social enterprise there was the cooperative movement. Come along and learn about the radical tradition that supports this growing global movement for a new economy. Examine the models of religious community (from monastic to Quaker and Methodist) that have informed the core cooperative principle of democratic governance by member-owners. Join our innovative collaboration with Co-operative Bonds and the Business Council of Cooperatives and Mutuals (BCCM) to workshop business models that might establish a café (or similar enterprise) as a cooperative.

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AR1000P / AR8000P

CONVERSATIONS: INTERDISCIPLINARY
THEOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES ON CONTEMPORARY ISSUES
John Flett

Field A – Religious Studies (AR)
Intensive: 16, 17, 20, 21, 22 July

Theme for 2020: Refugee status and religious conversion.

Interested in theological engagement from a number of perspectives on a hot-button cultural, social, or political issue? In 2020 our focus for theological conversation is refugee status and religious conversion. Is ‘conversion’ a theological concept or a policy category? Join experts in the theology of immigration, policy advocates and field workers to explore questions that are active in determinations of asylum seeker cases around the globe, and impacting ministry contexts in Melbourne.

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AR/CH1030P/ AR/CH2030P/ AR/CH8030P

REASON AND REVIVAL
Kerrie Handasyde

Field A – Religious Studies (AR)

Also available Field C – Church History (CH)
Semester 1: Wednesday Afternoon

Religious literature and music provides a rich source of learning. This unit examines the history of Protestantism in the eighteenth to mid-twentieth centuries through the lens of religious literature and music. Using a wide variety of texts including poetry, novels, hymns and songs, drama and memoirs, we seek to explore trends in the development of Protestant belief and spirituality around the world, with a special emphasis on the Australian experience. Topics include the Enlightenment, conversion and revival, social activism, nature, writing for children, and the life of the church.

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For more information about any of these courses, contact College registrar Erlinda Loverseed on 03 9340 8892 or at registrar@pilgrim.edu.au